Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Teaching Philosophy’ Category

rlclrose22

Very occasionally, in the morning when the weather is not too hot, I step out onto my front porch and sit on a broad wooden bench, looking out into my front yard and that of my neighbor’s, enjoying the coolness of the air with nothing save birdsong to disturb the silence. I may bring a cup of tea with me, and perhaps one of my cats will come to sit near.

For the moment, I am at rest. I own the ground upon which I sit. I am fully provisioned and no enemies appear on my immediate horizon. I am well aware that this is an illusion, but choose to pretend in the moment, that all is well. Now in my fifties, my ambitions are modest. “A home, respect, freedom, and neighbors who want the same” (Lamar). I desire peace and quiet broken only by the occasional company of my extended family and close friends. I think that this is a desire commonly held by the overwhelming majority of mature adults existent across the face of the earth, irrespective of their culture, their history, or their present social and economic position within their particular communities. In the following pages it is my intention to describe the realization of this desire by a certain class of men among the petit-bourgeoisie whom I shall refer to as neo-patriarchs.
(more…)

Read Full Post »

Pa’ntes A’nthropoi Tou^ Eide’nai Ore’gontai Phy’sei.
All men by nature desire to know. —Aristotle, Metaphysics, 1:1

rlclrose21 When one begins to take a closer look at Socrates of Athens, (469-399 B.C. ) it immediately becomes clear that he is a man in a unique and enviable position. A citizen of an established polis, he was neither obscure nor highly celebrated. His service to his country as a soldier was established, yet he did not distinguish himself to the extent that it required him to bear the burden of celebrity nor assume the mantle of hero (Vlastos, Pg. 50). He was born of a good family but not of a noble or patrician one. His father was an artist; a sculptor, he himself was an artisan; a stonemason. Apparently a man of limited independent means, he was far from what would be considered wealthy. This fortuitous combination of circumstances worked to place Socrates, not in the center of urban life and culture, but rather in the middle of it. He found himself in an ideal position to observe his fellow Athenians, and to interact and converse with them.
(more…)

Read Full Post »

Here is the latest in a series of stories with the same moral. An excerpt:

Universities will develop better business professionals if they do a better job of integrating components of a liberal arts education into business school curriculums, argues a new report by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

The report, Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession, argues that business schools are too distinct from the rest of the undergraduate education, and students are either not learning how to think critically about issues or not given the chance to connect their liberal arts studies to their business education. Either way, the authors argue, students are not prepared as well as they could be for engaging in the business world.

Read Full Post »

Ah, yes — education. It’s a topic that’s been talked about again and again and again and again and again and again and again and . . . . . . . . . . well, you get the picture. The matter has been mentioned and considered so many times on this blog that one might think “enough is enough.” Yet the importance of the topic overrides the repetition of its consideration.

This time around, in looking at education, I want to turn your attention to an e-mail I received a few weeks ago regarding our educational values. Granted, this e-mail was meant to be funny, and to serve as entertainment more than as a philosophical piece. But in speaking to a couple of “old-timers” who were in the public school system in the 1950s, I’ve found that what’s listed below isn’t as exaggerated as you might first think.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

From the website on “Roundtable on Philosophy for Children”  at the London School of Economics:

Despite a glorious native tradition boasting Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, David Hume and Bertrand Russell, to name but a few, our national school system has largely shunned philosophy. Nonetheless, there is increasing public interest in making philosophy a feature of the pre-university education system. Indeed, hundreds of primary schools nationwide are running weekly philosophy classes, while high-profile thinkers and celebrities have campaigned on the issue of the need for a ‘fourth “R”’: Reasoning.

(HT: Leiter Reports)

Read Full Post »

Hello to All!

After taking a detour with discussions on dogs, Google gods, and equality, it’s high-time for me to come back to something I started in an earlier post. However, this topic might also be appropriate for discussions about education (yep, everyone’s favorite topic is back!), so consider this to be a “two-birds-with-one-stone” thing as opposed to just a discussion on what I call “Meta-Philosophy”.

Without further ado, here comes the proverbial Act II in this series of posts.

———————————–

(more…)

Read Full Post »

… is here, and it is worth a look. (HT: Brian Leiter)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »