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Archive for the ‘Bioethics’ Category

Tom Bartlett discusses the issue in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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Harvard Bioethics Conference

The Harvard University Program in Ethics and Health invites you to attend the Sixth Annual International Bioethics Conference

New Strategies for Health Promotion: Steering Clear of Ethical Pitfalls

Thursday and Friday, April 28 and 29, 2011

Location:  The Inn at Longwood Medical, 342 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA

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Today, I heard a professor talk about the use of emotionally persuasive terms in abortion dialogue. He said to use the term baby for a 4 week old piece of tissue, and to call an abortion murder was absurd and inflammatory. These terms definitely obscure debate, but are they simply inflammatory terms? Though I was conflicted, I don’t believe this is the case.

Consider the fact that to many Christians there is a something called murder, as assured by a belief that there is such a thing as an objective moral truth, a truth firmly embedded in God, a real being. For them, God has deeply etched morality into the universe, making it real. For them, when you kill a human being, you have done an action that has a real existence as murder.

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NUBC 2011

From the National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference:

The 2011 National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference hosted at Duke University, March 18-20, 2011 is right around the corner. We hope you are considering coming to hear the great speakers and meet students from all over the country who are interested in bioethics!  We are covering a broad range of bioethical issues personalized medicine and genomics and in global health.  We are excited to have recently received so many great abstracts for student presentations and have just posted the ones we accepted on our website.

There is still time to sign up to as a team to participate in the Bioethics Bowl. Deadline is February 18.

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Have you ever Stepped on a nail and not felt it–then: Pain Strikes you. You’ve been standing on the nail for a minute, but because you had your mind focused on the hottie walking by, you didn’t notice it. This is revealing. It reveals that pain (the phenomenological pain) is a process of higher order functions. The “I” becomes aware of the of the pain and then it becomes “I-pain”. In psychology, there is a distinction between aversive reactions and physiological response to a stimuli and the phenomenological pain response to a stimuli. Aversive reactions can take place without pain, but are many times accompanied by pain—emotional or physical, which are processed in the same area of the brain (see last months Scientific American). Now, humans and higher order animals can feel pain, but lower order animals may not feel phenomenological pain because they don’t have the “I” concept or the ability the higher order brain functions to process suffering as anything more than a stimuli and response. When we talk about ethics with animals, we should consider degrees of suffering.

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Internship Opportunities

The Hastings Center

offers an intern program that provides undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to work at The Hastings Center, either on a particular project or project-in-development or in a particular Hastings Center department such as Library, Editorial, or Development.

For summer internships (May – August), applications should be received before March 1st. At all other times, prospective interns should apply at least 4 weeks before they would anticipate beginning the internship.

E-mail: mail@thehastingscenter.org
Web Site: http://www.thehastingscenter.org/About/Default.aspx?id=1142

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This is an interesting piece that highlights, among other things, the role of political ideology in shaping the public understanding of ‘disease’, ‘disorder’, and ‘science’.

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